nevver:

The Design Deck

(via kind-der-sonne)

"A world in which there are monsters, and ghosts, and things that want to steal your heart is a world in which there are angels, and dreams and a world in which there is hope."

Neil Gaiman (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)

(via journalofanobody)

journalofanobody:

Vonnegut

journalofanobody:

Vonnegut

(Source: b-a-d-habits)

miss-morgue495:

I have a need


I. Need. This.

miss-morgue495:

I have a need

I. Need. This.

(Source: eperdu, via salparadisewasright)

"All right, but apart from the sanitation, medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, the fresh water system and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?"

Monty Python’s The Life of Brian (via similarfruit)

(via montypythons-flyingcircus)

(Source: youngadultatbooktopia, via yahighway)

"I would think for hours how strange it was that some parts of words are silent, just like some parts of our lives. Did the people who wrote the dictionaries decide to mirror language to our lives, or did it just happen that way?"

Rene Denfeld, The Enchanted (via booksquoteslove)

(via literatureismyutopia)

Talking Heads – Once in a Lifetime (239 plays)

latenebreuse:

Talking Heads. Once In A Lifetime.

yourcatwasdelicious:

mark twain

yourcatwasdelicious:

mark twain

(via dionysianperspectives)

myjetpack:

Happy Easter!

myjetpack:

Happy Easter!

(via eyepool)

(Source: outrageauxbonnesmoeurs, via dionysianperspectives)

"If you don’t make mistakes, you’re doing it wrong. If you don’t correct those mistakes, you’re doing it really wrong. If you can’t accept that you’re mistaken, you’re not doing it at all."

Moshe Feldenkrais (Ukraine, 1904-1984)

(Source: the-seraphic-book-of-eloy, via the-unknown-friend)

terrenonussbukorrek:

Fiona Watson - exhibit one (wild goose chase)

terrenonussbukorrek:

Fiona Watson - exhibit one (wild goose chase)

(via neutralnotes)

artistacarmencassighi:

Carmen Cassighi

artistacarmencassighi:

Carmen Cassighi

(via lilacsinthedooryard)

gazophylacium:


This collection of temari balls was made by an 88-year-old Japanese grandmother who started crafting these in her sixties.
The carefully hand-embroidered balls often made from the thread of old kimonos were created by parents or grandparents and given to children on New Year’s day as special gift. According to Wikipedia the balls would sometimes contain secret handwritten wish for the child, or else contained some kind of noise-making object like a bell.
The technique originated from China before being exported to Japan in the seventh century. Temari is the Japanese term for this fascinating form of folk art.

gazophylacium:

This collection of temari balls was made by an 88-year-old Japanese grandmother who started crafting these in her sixties.

The carefully hand-embroidered balls often made from the thread of old kimonos were created by parents or grandparents and given to children on New Year’s day as special gift. According to Wikipedia the balls would sometimes contain secret handwritten wish for the child, or else contained some kind of noise-making object like a bell.

The technique originated from China before being exported to Japan in the seventh century. Temari is the Japanese term for this fascinating form of folk art.

(Source: secure.isidewith.com, via plurdledgabbleblotchits)